Sponsor an Animal

Experience the joy of sponsoring an animal!

 

At Aloha Animal Sanctuary, we run completely off volunteers and donations like yours. There are no paid positions here.

All donations go towards caring for the animals. 

 

If you wish to sponsor a resident, please take a look below.

To see our complete gallery of photographs, please visit @alohaanimalsanctuary on Instagram.

 

Sponsors receive:
 

A certificate of sponsorship, 3 Aloha Animal Sanctuary logo stickers, quarterly updates, and a portrait of their animal.

 

After 1 year of being a sponsor, you will receive a private tour for up to 6 people where you will meet your sponsored animal and the other rescued residents of the sanctuary. If you are off-island, we will offer a virtual tour.

 

Become a sponsor today to contribute to one of our resident's care!

HAKU

Haku was destined for slaughter but was brought to our attention just in time. We were able to negotiate for Haku's freedom and now he's the sanctuary's first resident and ambassador.

 

He will live out his days happily, free from fear and harm. He moved in at the end of 2018 and is adjusting to his new home quite nicely! Haku loves to root and wallow in the cool mud, frolic around his enclosure, and play soccer!​

FRANCIS

Francis is a Muscovy duck! Muscovy ducks are a domesticated species that have long been bred for meat. Francis was rescued along with his sister Fern as abandoned pets at risk for euthanasia. Our landlord, Melissa is an avid bird-lover and rehabber and sent them our way.

 

Francis has quite the personality. He is passionate, fun, and sassy! He loves when our caretaker volunteers fill up his pool with fresh water, he eagerly waits to dive right in! Francis also enjoys excursions to the sanctuary's natural ponds, and greeting visitors with hisses and tail wagging. 

HEI HEI

Yes, "Hei Hei" like the chicken in Moana. He was saved from death when a family found him severely wounded. He was bleeding, missing many of his feathers, and he was very weak. It was immediately apparent that something was wrong with his right eye, as well. He was rescued by the family and brought inside their home to recover. As he got better, he began hanging out with their dog and kids, and soon he thought he was just another member of the gang. 

Hei-Hei loves to crow and makes the sweetest rooster noises.  He enjoys eating bananas and receiving hugs from our caretaker volunteers.  He has become inseparable with Moana, his best friend, and roommate! 

ELEANOR

Eleanor is a beautiful senior pig living at the sanctuary, being about 9-12 years old. She was rescued from an extreme neglect case. Eleanor was found starving, alone in a concrete pen, living in her own waste. Her owner had already starved two of his horses and a pig to death and was doing the same to Eleanor (for reasons unknown). Luckily, Eleanor was noticed by a woman who began bringing her food scraps and was eventually able to rescue her.

 

Despite all that Eleanor has gone through, she is the most affectionate pig with such an open heart, with only love to give to all who visit her at the sanctuary. She has become best friends with Haku. They cuddle every night! Eleanor is the queen and bosses Haku around, which means she gets first dibs on papayas!  

CHARLOTTE

Charlotte was rescued from a pig farm located on the Leeward side of Oahu. Almost all of Charlotte's siblings died from being squashed and suffocated accidentally by their mom. This is an incredibly tragic but common occurrence at pig farms, where mama pigs are kept in gestation crates so small they can't change body positions or move. 

Luckily, Charlotte's story took a turn for the better when she crossed paths with her rescuers.

Charlotte loves back scratches and belly rubs.  She loves being misted with water and runs around and sometimes does a "piggy pirouette" and twirls around in a circle.

YORU, aka "RU"

Yoru is a Polynesian pig born in the wild. She was found alone by a popular hiking trail, where she was approaching people and asking for scraps, and sleeping under a nearby house. She was always seen alone, and never with her family. Normally young piglets like Ru would always be with their mom and siblings. We do not know what happened to her 'ohana, and we don't know why she wasn't with them. Our guess is that they were hunted, which is common fate for wild pigs in Hawai'i. 

Ru has been at the sanctuary since September and she has become inseparable from Charlotte. She is very comfortable with humans, especially when they rub her belly! 

LUNA

Luna and Ares were surrendered to the Hawaiian Humane Society who then reached out to the sanctuary with hopes we would accept them into our 'ohana. They are Muscovy ducks, which is a breed commonly used for meat. The Humane Society was concerned they would be adopted for the wrong reasons, as were we, so we brought them to the sanctuary where they will be protected for the rest of their lives. 

 

Luna has a very relaxed, calm temperament. Ares is a bit more...bold, which isn't an uncommon trait in ducks.

 

Ares and Luna are enjoying the fresh air, sunshine, and all of the bugs the sanctuary has to over. They love swimming in their pool and follow each other everywhere – they are quite the lovers. 

ARES

Ares and Luna were surrendered to the Hawaiian Humane Society who then reached out to the sanctuary with hopes we would accept them into our 'ohana. They are Muscovy ducks, which is a breed commonly used for meat. The Humane Society was concerned they would be adopted for the wrong reasons, as were we, so we brought them to the sanctuary where they will be protected for the rest of their lives. 

Luna has a very relaxed, calm temperament. Ares is a bit more...bold, which isn't an uncommon trait in ducks.

 

Ares and Luna are enjoying the fresh air, sunshine, and all of the bugs the sanctuary has to over. They love swimming in their pool and follow each other everywhere – they are quite the lovers. 

 

WAIPUNA 'Ā KA MAHINA

aka "WAI"

Her name translates to: spring water that shines bright like the moon. Her light is a reflection of the moonlight. Hina is the woman in the moon, and is the mother of Maui. She controls the waves and tides. We wanted to tie her name into Waipuna's and ask Hina to be like a mother to her. Now Hina will always be looking over her while she grows. 

 Wai came from a truly sad situation out in the mountains of Mākaha. People caught a bunch of little goats like Wai and stole them from their mothers to sell on Craigslist. She was only about a week old at the time, and the people quickly realized she needed 24 hr care being so young and without a mother to feed her.

 

She was rescued and fostered for months by our garden leader, Brian, who had become Wai's dad! She has now moved into the sanctuary and is living the goat life!

MOANA

This gentle lady was found at the Windward Mall parking lot. She couldn't even stand and was getting soaked by the rain. Some sweet children found her and begged their mom to help. So they brought her home and cared for her, and she lived.

She was brought to the sanctuary and will live out her life in peace with Hei-Hei and the rest of the gang! Moana enjoys belly rubs and finding bugs with Hei Hei. She loves to perch on the volunteers' heads, and is quite the hairstylist!

DUCKLEE

Ducklee was rescued by a family when he was just a baby. He was found alone, with a wing deformity that disabled him from being able to fly. The family loves Ducklee very much but they felt bad keeping him caged and alone at their home and knew he would have a better life at the sanctuary.

Ducklee is very friendly, no doubt because of the amazing family he was raised by. He is a very chatty duck, with a lot to express! He loves his pool time and enjoys being the lead sidekick to each of the caretaker volunteers, chasing them around and aiding in daily sanctuary duties!

 

Ducklee has clambered into many of our volunteers’ laps (and hearts) and we are so happy to welcome him into our Aloha family.

ANNA

Meet Anna. She and her sanctuary sister Elsa came from a local goat dairy farm. On any kind of dairy farm, in order for goats or cows to produce milk, they must deliver a baby first. In order to continue producing milk, many babies must be delivered throughout their lives.

 

Anna was a runt and would not have produced as much milk as the others, so she was going to be sold online for her meat. Thankfully, she was donated to us by the farmer so she could live out the rest of her life with her sister!

 

In dairy, the animals only live a small portion of their lives before they are killed, and their value is dependent on the amount of milk they produce. At the sanctuary, we believe every animal has inherent value and deserves freedom and protection. 

 

Anna is a total sweetheart and requests constant cuddles! She is a lap goat, and will find any way she can to get as close to you as goatly possible! 

ELSA

Meet Elsa. She and her sanctuary sister Anna came from a local goat dairy farm. On any kind of dairy farm, in order for goats or cows to produce milk, they must deliver a baby first. In order to continue producing milk, many babies must be delivered throughout their lives.

 

Elsa was a runt and would not have produced as much milk as the others, so she was going to be sold online for her meat. Thankfully, she was donated to us by the farmer so she could live out the rest of her life with her sister!

 

In dairy, the animals only live a small portion of their lives before they are killed, and their value is dependent on the amount of milk they produce. At the sanctuary, we believe every animal has inherent value and deserves freedom and protection. 

 

To our surprise, Elsa was rescued pregnant and gave birth to Pili on May 5, 2020. Elsa and Pili will live the rest of their lives together at the sanctuary. 

FERN

Fern is a Muscovy duck. Muscovy ducks are a domesticated species that have long been bred for meat. Fern was rescued along with her brother Francis as abandoned pets at risk for euthanasia. Our landlord, Melissa is an avid bird-lover and rehabber and sent them our way.

 

Fern was abandoned as a baby with a leg deformity caused by a nutrient deficiency. Her foot had grown inward, and she was unable to use it. Unfortunately, she never regained strength in the injured leg. Fern has daily morning physical therapy stretches, pool time, and the sanctuary is working with the University of Hawaii's body mechanic students to create a prosthetic for Fern. 

 

Fern is the sweetest little girl. She deserves all that life has to offer! She has become friends with Eve, a young blonde mallard resident at the sanctuary.

Billy

It’s truly incredible that Elsa and her baby are alive today. Elsa was considered a byproduct of the dairy farm she came from, and was destined to be sold on Craigslist for slaughter. At some point before she was meant to be sold, she became pregnant. When we asked the dairy if they would spare the lives of a pair of goats, and send them to sanctuary, they chose Elsa and Anna. They had no idea Elsa was pregnant, and neither did we. Her baby is truly a miracle. He is incredible. He is such a blessing and we love him so much. He is silly, playful, friendly, and so loving. He is perfect.

We asked one of our generous donors to name him, and together him and his daughter chose the name Billy. His English name is Billy and the Hawaiian name for Billy is Pili. He is absolutely precious! Everyone help us in welcoming him to this world!

PAXTON

Paxton was found by a local woman named Andria at the beach on the north shore. He was lying on the ground, emaciated, and unable to get up. It was clear that he was suffering, and that he had been suffering for a while. Adria offered him some of her snacks and his eyes lit up, and she knew he wanted to live.

 

Andria called everyone she thought may be able to help, including HHS, DLNR, etc. For three days straight Andria drove up to visit Paxton and brought him food and water. She wanted to get him off the beach and somewhere safe but didn’t know how or where. Her friends came with her too, and soon they were all attached to Paxton, offering up their apples and other treats they had packed for themselves. 

 

Finally, Andria got ahold of a vet who came out to help. The vet knew us at the sanctuary, and called us to ask if we could help provide a place for Paxton to recover. We thought he could potentially have an infection and simply need antibiotics, however, after getting Paxton into a clinic and reviewing his x-ray, we realized his leg bones had been shattered. He has what looks like a pellet or bullet wound on his leg which may have been what caused him to get so skinny and sickly.

 

Paxton is at the sanctuary now and getting the care he needs. He was covered in lice and ticks when he first arrived, so we treated this and did our best to make him feel comfortable. He has a good appetite and is making a recovery at the sanctuary.

PŌMAIKA‘I

 Pōmaika‘i means blessing, and that’s exactly what this little guy is.⁣ ⁣
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Pōmaika‘i was found on the side of the road, by a concerned woman out walking with her baby. She could see that he was suffering, unable to see or move, huddled up. He needed help. She alerted one of our directors and we quickly went to him, wrapped a towel around him, and rushed him to the vet.⁣ 
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We soon realized that Pōmaika‘i was a victim of cockfighting. His little rooster crown and neck waddles had clearly been cut off by humans, a standard practice in the industry. However, Pōmai did not have any wounds on his legs or body, which we would normally see on roosters who had been fought (usually in a cockfight, humans attach small blades to the roosters’ legs so it will be a more gruesome match). The humans who had been using Pōmai may have decided that he was not a top-of-the-line fighter, and decided to use him for training for the others. We have been told that is common practice for humans to hold roosters in front of other fighting roosters, and let the fighting roosters attack the “practice rooster” who has no chance of escape. This is most likely what led to the horrific injuries to his eyes, skull, and face. It’s terrible, and it hurts to write, but his story must be told. ⁣⁣
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He is in the home of an experienced rehabber now, getting food, pain medication, and wound treatment. He has regained eyesight in his right eye and may regain it in his left. He loves being cuddled, eating, and hanging out with his three-legged dog friend Val.
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We are creating space for him so he can live the rest of his life at the sanctuary, free from harm. 

EVE

There is a small pond in Nuuanu where, according to a neighbor, people have abandoned many pet ducks and koi for the past decade. 

 

The neighbor found Eve (duckling in the video) alone one morning, and thinks someone abandoned her, thinking an adult duck would take care of her. The woman is familiar with the ducks in the area, and knew there were no current mothers with ducklings. Eve was found on New Year’s Eve.  Based on her size, she was born that day or the day before. She would not have survived the night on her own without the help of the woman. Eve is an unusual color variation called a blond mallard who don’t survive long in the wild because they lack natural camouflage. It is a condition similar to albinism.

We Kindly Ask For Your Support Today!

Aloha Animal Sanctuary

A place where people can visit and form meaningful relationships with the animals.

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